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Questions and Answers about Working Holiday Visas to Australia

What is a working holiday?

Australia offers a working holiday program, in which young people from around the world can apply for a temporary visa that allows them to visit Australia and work for up to a year. According to the Australian Department of Immigration and Border Protection, the working holiday visa “encourages cultural exchange and closer ties between Australia and eligible countries.”

What are the advantages of doing a working holiday in Australia?

What other incentive do you need beyond having the opportunity to live in Australia?!  But seriously, it’s a great chance to spend some time abroad, earn money (Australia has a great minimum wage!), meet new people, and gain interesting experience. And what better time than now?

What kind of visa do I need to do a working holiday in Australia?

You will need to apply for either a 417 working holiday or 462 work and holiday visa, depending on what country you are from. Here are the differences between 417 and 462 visas.

Read this complete guide to getting a working holiday visa for British residents, it has all the information needed to guide you through the process and what to expect.

What are the requirements for getting a working holiday visa?

First of all, you must hold a valid passport from one of the Working Holiday Program’s eligible countries (Argentina, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, German, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey, the U.S. or the UK). You must also be between the ages of 18 and 30, have enough money to support yourself, not be accompanied by dependent children, and meet certain health requirements. You can find more details about the requirements for the 417 visa here and the 462 visa here.

Where can I live in Australia?

Working holiday makers are welcome to live anywhere in Australia! You may choose to find a job in bustling Sydney, the relaxed beach town of Byron Bay, the wilderness of the Outback, or anywhere else. It’s up to you!

What kind of work can I do once I’m in Australia?

Anything, really! Many working holiday makers work part or full time in restaurants, hospitality, retail, tourism or agriculture, but others choose to look for work in their specific field. The only restriction is that you can only legally work for one employer for up to six months, after which you’ll have to look for new work.

What’s the best way to find work in Australia?

Gumtree, SEEK, and Indeed are three great sites for searching for jobs. Also consider registering with a temp recruitment agency, such as people2people, who can help you find jobs that suit your skills and interests.

What if I decide I want to stay in Australia longer than a year?

Can’t blame you for that! 417 visa holders may complete three months of specified regional work (e.g. working on a farm) in order to apply for a second year in Australia. Some working holidaymakers also end up getting sponsored by their employers, applying for partner visas, or enroling in a university and switching over to a student visa.
Good luck, and enjoy Australia! For more information on Australian working holidays, check out AussieWorkingHoliday.com, brought to you by people2people.

Questions and Answers about Working Holidays in Australia submitted by:

Aussie Working Holidays

 

 

 

AussieWorkingHoliday.com is the ultimate resource for working holiday makers in Australia, with tips and information on visas, job seeking, settling in, and exploring Australia. 

Phone:02 8270 9700


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2018-11-27T22:29:13+00:00By |Working in Oz|

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